HexTerra – Sales Data Analysis

This week I’ve once again done zero with respect to game development. Sometimes life just gets in the way of all the fun stuff! But I told myself that I would try my hardest to stick to a weekly blog post, so here we are.

HexTerra has now been on the market for almost exactly a month, so I figured it was probably time to take a look at some of the data. I’m not going to do a deep dive into analysis, contrary to the title. Just some very basic number crunching. Before we look at the data, though, a couple of things to keep in mind:

  1. I have done zero advertising within the DriveThruRPG platform.
  2. I posted in three (maybe four) Facebook groups about the initial release, once only.
  3. I released HexTerra as “Pay What You Want”, including free, with a suggested price of AU$3.00 (approx US$2.25).

 

So, what we’re about to see is pretty much “organic” data.

First, a chart I produced based on the line-by-line sales reports available from DriveThruRPG:

 

So what are we looking at here?

  • In total, there has been 85 individual downloads of the product. I’m told that this really is quite a good result compared to many text-based RPG products. I can only imagine that this is due to the fact that those of us who love our 3D printers will jump at the chance to check out new files wherever we see them.
  • Of these 85 downloads, 7 have been paid downloads. In general, the majority of people who have paid have done so at or above the recommended price – good data to have for the future, I suppose.
  • The total income has been US$15.13. By the time DriveThruRPG take their cut and it’s converted to AU$, it’s basically even.
  • The first few days of a product’s life on DriveThruRPG are the most exciting, as it appears on the front page, getting many, many eyes on it. This is pretty clearly reflected in the chart above. Once HexTerra dropped off the “newest” listing, downloads dropped right off.

 

Now, let’s take a look at a screenshot straight from what DriveThruRPG calls a “Title Analysis”:

 

 

These figures are actually looking at the entire lifespan of the product, not the first 30 days as discussed above. As a result, some of the sales data doesn’t match what I’ve just told you. It’s OK – this just reflects sales made after Month 1.

What I particularly wanted to point out is the top line – there have been 1037 total page views on the HexTerra Product Page. If we couple that with the 8 paid purchases, we get an interesting number: Views Per Purchase (VPP. I just coined it. It’ll catch on, and soon all the Cool Kids (TM) will be using it. Just you watch). A lower VPP is better, as it means you have a higher sales rate – people are more likely to buy your product after seeing it.

HexTerra’s VPP is currently (1037/8) = 129.6

130 people open the HexTerra page and take a look for every one person who decides to stump up some cash. I don’t have any data to compare this with other products – either 3D printer files or PDF text materials – so I really don’t know how this compares to the rest of the landscape. I’m neither impressed nor disappointed – the number simply is.

Now the challenge is two-fold:

  1. How do I improve this, and
  2. Do I actually want to? This is all just for fun at this stage.

 

Chime in with your suggestions! And if any other publishers are game enough, I’d be crazy interested in comparing data.

 

Yours in Adventure,

Shane.

 

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